Alicia Puig

Alicia Puig

Three

As the common saying goes "two's company, three's a crowd', referencing an unwelcome guest when two people (usually a couple) would prefer to spend time by themselves without a third wheel. Indeed, the presence of a third person can occasionally feel unbalanced or awkward depending on the situation. On the other hand, as it relates to the spiritual and divine realm, certain trios enjoy a status at the highest level of historical and cultural significance, such as The Holy Trinity or The Three Graces, for example. And as a society, we also often categorize or define aspects of our lives in threes: beginning, middle, and end, or past, present, and future. Three allows for a middle ground whereas a duo of opposites does not. There is a completely unique tension and narrative between three entities that cannot be replicated with two. The artists selected for this collection all made a deliberate choice to present three figures, whether for symbolic reasons or compositional harmony, or perhaps both. In depicting three figures, they utilize the trio as a pictorial and narrative device, capitalizing on the interplay between these interconnected relationships to express mystery, strength, focus, charm, or even a bit of humor.

The Surreal and semi-abstract oil on canvas painting by Kiera explores the enigmas of the quantum world pairing mythical figures with floating white orbs and woodgrain waves. That the central figure dissects the image in a way that creates a central portal gives the work an otherworldly feel. Alan Fink's "Jazzmen" also has its own distinct mood. The saturated primary tones and movement of the drumsticks caught in midair evoke the upbeat hum of music being played by a live band. Bruce Dean's sketchy scene illustrates the main characters of The Great Gatsby. Like the book itself, this artwork is one sure to be enjoyed by many. "Internal Dialogue" by Jake Alfieri grapples with the fragmentation of the self, separating mind, body, and soul into three individual sculptures. When imagining this collection presented together in a physical space, these works would add an exciting element for the audience to engage with considering their larger-than-life scale. Three hooded figures convene in "Moirae", creating a sense of intrigue. Are the subjects hiding, sheltering from the cold, or conducting a clandestine meeting? It is no surprise that the work has been described as a painting shrouded in mystery. Kathleen D'Aloia captures an everyday scene at a neighborhood bar in "It's Friday Night!". Catching three gentlemen in conversation, each peculiarly dressed for the setting, she gives us a peek into their respective personalities. Working with a limited palette gives Thomas Blood's homage to The Three Stooges a unique visual twist. The stark contrasts emphasize their exaggerated sour expressions. Finally, the three resplendent figures in "Life, Strength, Resilience" portray a powerful message of hope in the face of tragedy and fear.

Feedback