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Subway #10

  • Subway 10-small.jpeg
Fan - 4 Expert - 12
$1,275.00

Part of an ongoing NYC subway transit system series depicting scenes of pandemic life through painterly character studies.

Responses (3)

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Natalie Pivoney

June 23, 2022

Love this, her stare is perfect and the bit of orange behind her completes the composition.

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Pip Phelps
Pip Phelps Artist

June 06, 2022

I like your distortion in this figure

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John Crowther
John Crowther Critic

May 31, 2022

Observing strangers on daily subway commutes is a time-honored New York City tradition. I guess some people never look up until they arrive at their destination, but I have never met or heard of them. RP Coleman’s Subway #10 captures the strange duality of unfamiliar and familiar that defines these journeys. Most jobs necessitate a degree of commuter rhythm. Depending on where one lives, only a few combinations of different subway lines get one to work. Besides the incessant delays, there is no unbroken stream of commonality between one commute and the next. However, there is a feeling born of constantly seeing half-forgotten faces and glimpses of familiar expressions. One is rarely sure if the person resting their head on the pole was the same person one saw last week or just another face in the crowd. The feeling these instances inspire lies somewhere in between nostalgia and déjà vu. It is what makes New York feel no unbearable and so wonderful.

Seeing millions of people every day who you do not know and will never know (but, occasionally, think you might know, in the way you know any stranger) can feel alienating and depressing. Being around so many people without acknowledging them can leave one feeling hopelessly dejected and disconnected from the world. We begin to think that we are not a part of humanity but simply navigating our way through its endless tunnels. There is no doubt we are making our way through unpredictable hordes of people, but that does not mean we have to do so joylessly. RP Coleman paints people in subways, and New Yorkers stare at their fellow passengers because that's how you enjoy the journey. That's what makes your maddening commutes rewarding and not soul-crushing. It is the same inclination that drives all artists: to find humanity.

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RP Coleman
RP Coleman Creator

June 05, 2022

Thanks, John. Much appreciated. I definitely search for the familiar with each stranger I spend time painting. I find it hard to escape the conversation of loneliness, especially in these subway paintings.

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John Crowther
John Crowther Critic

July 01, 2022

it is a prescient reminder that we are all experiencing something similar even when we feel the most remote and solitary. It gives me a sense of solidarity and hope!

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RP Coleman
Creator
Category
Portrait, Figurative
Type
Painting - Unframed
Materials
Acrylic, Canvas
Dimensions
16.00 inches wide
20.00 inches tall
1.50 inches deep
Weight
1.00 lbs
Location
Brooklyn, NY, US
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